Ways You Can Get Food Poisoning

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Food poisoning also named as a foodborne illness is usually caused by bacteria and, viruses or germs that can get into what we eat and drink. As we cannot seem taste or smell injurious bacteria and germs, they can have a harmful effect on our body and overall health to make us sick.

Common symptoms of food poisoning are:

Vomiting

Stomach cramps

Nausea

Diarrhea

Lake of hunger etc.

This article is all about the ways you can get food poisoning and foods that can cause food poisoning.

1 Eggs & Poultry

The bacteria named Salmonella which can cause food poisoning can easily blot any type of food and animal products are on greater risk due to the direct interaction with animal feces. It can infect eggs before the shell forms. It can infect eggs before the shell forms, and even Salmonella can harbor in clean eggs. Symptoms of food poisoning caused by eggs and poultry usually include fever, stomach cramps, and diarrhea, etc. The victim may suffer from the issue up to 5 days approximately.

How to Stay Safe

Never ever try to eat raw or half-cooked eggs in your meals. In order to prevent food poisoning caused by poultry, you should cook it to 165 Foreign height. Also, keep raw poultry separate from cooked and make sure your hands & utensils are cleaned after handling.

2 Fresh Produces

Fresh produces can also cause food poison because of salmonella infections. Most of the Epidemics have been associated with fresh produce like tomatoes, hot peppers, and papayas because they are grown in a humid and warm atmosphere. Raw eaten or lightly cooked fresh produces can have an effect on the health of babies and elders.

How to Stay Safe

Properly wash dry fresh produces and keep them in the refrigerator at 40° F.

3 Processed Foods

Crackers, soup, and frozen foods are some of the ways you can get food poisoning as they may also pose a minor risk of salmonella infection. According to experts, the salmonella outbreak was found on peanut butter and some of the packed frozen foods.

How to Stay Safe

Don’t use the recalled products and throw them away from your pantry. Foods processed on the heat 165 F can slay the salmonella bacteria.

4 Raw Meat

Raw meat is usually at the greater risks of salmonella pollution. No one can find out that food is affected by the bacteria because it smells and looks normal.

How to Stay Safe

Always cook beef and lamb as a minimum 145 F to 165 F. Ground beef should be cooked at 160F in order to prevent food poisoning. Also, keep your hands and surfaced cleaned with warm water and soap.

5 Sprouts

Sprouts of all kind like sunflower and mung bean are considered as one of the major causes of food poisoning. Presence of different bacteria like Salmonella and E. coli make sprouts a way you can become a victim of food poison. As seeds usually require a nutrient-rich and warm condition to grow, these things are ideal for quick growth of bacteria. However, proper cooking kills harmful bacteria from sprouts to make them healthy to eat.

How to Stay Safe

Cooking the sprouts thoroughly kills the bacteria to reduce the risks of food poisoning.

6 Raw Juice and Milk

Purifications use warmth to kill bacteria. That is the reason, raw juices can be directly associated with foodborne illness. However, juices taken from the groceries have usually come with no risks of food poison. Raw milk also can cause food poison due to the unclean milking containers and equipment.

How to Stay Safe

Buying the products that are purified. Or if you are not sure that juice or milk is purified, boil before consuming.

7 Raw Vegetables & Fruits

Raw vegetables and fruits can contain Listeria bacteria that can affect the overall health of pregnant females and newborn. It can also cause food poison with several symptoms like upset stomach, fever and muscle aches, etc.

How to Stay Safe

Wash and scrub raw vegetables and fruits before cutting and eating. Also, keep such things in fridge 40 F. clean everything in contact with raw vegetables and fruits to prevent food poisoning.

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